2017 Editorial Board

Editor-in-Chief

Matthew Zipf

Publisher

Anamaria lopez

 

Design editor

Theresa yang 

Marketing Director

Huhe yaN

arts editors

michelle huang

charly voelkel

lead web editor

poorvi bellur

Managing Editors

amanda kam

dimitrius keeler

shambhavi Tiwari 

karen yuan

Copy Chief

Maggie Toner

Senior Editors

vivian casillas

audrey deGuerrera

brian gao

belle harris

melissa ho

jahan nanji

sheena qiao

bani sapra

nina zweig

Copy Editors

sahana narayanan

song rhee

Events 03/30-04/03

Events 03/30-04/03

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Monday, Mar 30th

Roundtable Discussion on the Proposal for an International Anti-Corruption Court

Monday, March 30, 2015 - 3:00pm - 5:00pm

Columbia University Morningside Campus William and June Warren Hall Room 101

By invitation only.

This event will bring together academics, legal experts and policy makers to discuss the case for the establishment of an International Anti-Corruption Court (IACC) proposed by Senior United States District Court Judge Mark L. Wolf. Given the pressing need to enhance anti-corruption efforts worldwide, the IACC would function as a mechanism to enforce laws prohibiting serious public corruption. For details visit http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2014/07/international-anti-corruption-court-wolf.

Columbia University students are invited to participate as observers in this roundtable discussion. If you are interested, please RSVP to cgeg@columbia.edu. Co-sponsored by the Center on Global Economic Governance and the Center for the Advancement of Public Integrity.

SAI: Siddharth Varadarajan on "Modi as P.M.: A Preliminary Balance Sheet"

Monday, March 30, 2015 - 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Columbia University Morningside Campus Knox Hall, Room 208
Siddharth Varadarajan is a journalist and senior fellow at the Centre for Public Affairs and Critical Theory, New Delhi. He was until October 2013 the Editor of The Hindu. An economist by training, he studied at the London School of Economics and Columbia University and taught at New York University before returning to India to work as a journalist. He has been a visiting lecturer at the journalism school at the University of California, Berkeley and a Poynter Fellow at Yale University.
For further information regarding this event, please contact Bill Carrick by sending email towac2112@columbia.edu.

Contested Normality: Bedouin \\\"Citizens\\\" Under the Supreme Court of Israel

Monday, March 30, 2015 - 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Columbia University Morningside Campus Law School Jerome GreeneHall Room 103



Suhad Bishara, 2014-2015 Palestine & Law Fellow at the Center for Palestine Studies, will speak about the role played by the Israeli Supreme Court in \\\'normalizing displacement\\\' of Palestinian citizens of Israel in the Naqab (Negev) desert, and facilitating recent re-construction of space.

Bishara is a senior attorney and Head of the Land and Planning Unit of Adalah - The Legal Center for Arab Minority Rights in Israel. She has litigated numerous constitutional rights cases before the Israeli Supreme Court concerning the land rights of Palestinian citizens of Israel and Palestinians living in the Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT). She co-authored a report in 2011 about the State of Israel\\\'s attempt to expel Arab Bedouin citizens of the state from their village in the Naqab.

Moderated by Professor Katherine Franke, Isidor & Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law; Director, Center for Gender and Sexuality Law, Columbia Law School.

This event is sponsored by the Center for Palestine Studies, the Middle East Instutie, and Adalah - The Legal Center for Arab Minority Rights in Israel.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Dahlia El Zein by sending email to de2304@columbia.edu or by calling 212-851-2992.

Outcome of the Iranian Nuclear Negotiations and Outlook for U.S. Policy

Monday, March 30, 2015 - 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Columbia University Morningside Campus Faculty House Presidential Ballroom

Please join the Center on Global Energy Policy for a discussion on the outcome of Iranian nuclear negotiations and next steps for U.S. policy, featuring Richard Nephew, former U.S. negotiator with Iran and current Director of the Center on Global Energy Policy's new program on Economic Statecraft, Sanctions, and Energy Markets, Dr. Gary Samore, Executive Director for Research at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, and President of United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI), and Gary Sick, Senior Research Scholar, Middle East Institute at Columbia University.

The deadline for an agreement on the political elements of a deal resulting from ongoing nuclear negotiations between Iran and the members of the P5+1 (China, France, Germany, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States, coordinated by the EU) is March 24. The results of the talks will have significant implications for the stability of the Middle East, the future integrity of the nuclear nonproliferation regime, and the international economy.

This event will be livestreamed at: energypolicy.columbia.edu

For further information regarding this event, please contact Ke Wei by sending email to kwei@columbia.edu .

Tuesday, Mar 31st

(Un)natural Disasters: Drought and Distributive Politics in Brazil

Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 6:30pm - 8:00pm
Columbia University Morningside Campus Schermerhorn Extension, Room 457

A talk with Alicia Cooperman, Columbia University.

Food and beverages will be served.

Papers will be circulated one week in advance. For a copy of papers presented, please email lfc2129@columbia.edu.

For further information regarding this event, please contact ILAS by sending email to ilasRSVP@gmail.com.

Intelligence Squared Debate: The President Has Exceeded His Constitutional Authority By Waging War Without Congressional Authorization

Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 6:45pm - 8:15pm
Columbia University Morningside Campus Miller Theater

Cost: $25 for general admission, $15 for Columbia alumni, $5 for all students (w/ valid ID), $5 for Columbia Faculty and Staff (w/ valid ID)

The Richman Center in partnership with Intelligence Squared U.S. and the National Constitution Center invite you to this exciting debate. The President has launched a sustained, long-term military campaign against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. But did he have constitutional power to do so?

The President has launched a sustained, long-term military campaign against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. But did he have constitutional power to do so? The Constitution carefully divides the war powers of the United States between Congress and the President. Article II provides that The President shall be Commander in Chief. But Article I provides that The Congress shall have Power To Declare War. In this case, Congress has not declared war; the President ordered the attacks unilaterally. Did he exceed his authority and violate the Constitution?

Against the motion are Philip Bobbitt, the Herbert Wechsler Professor of Federal Jurisprudence and Director of the Center for National Security at Columbia Law Schooland Jake Sullivan, Lecturer, Yale Law School & Former Director of Policy Planning, U.S. State Dept. For the motion are Gene Healy, Vice President, Cato Institute & Author, False Idol and Deborah Pearlstein, Assistant Professor, Cardozo Law & Former Director, Law & Security Program, Human Rights First. The debate will be moderated by John Donvan, Author and Correspondent for ABC News. Intelligence Squared is producing this debate for a live national television and radio audience.

Intelligence Squared is producing this debate for a live national television and radio audience.

For more information please contact the Richman Center at: richmancenter@gsb.columbia.edu

Buy tickets online, or the Miller Theater Box Office in the Theater Lobby, or by phone at (212) 854-7799

 

Wednesday, Apr 1st

"The Inner Form of the Word" in Russian Formalist Theory

Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
olumbia University Morningside Campus International Affairs Building Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room (Room 1219)

Please join the Harriman Institute for a talk by Igor Pilshchikov, Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russia) and Tallinn University (Estonia).

Professor Pilshchikov's lecture relates to the development of the ideas of Russian and German neo-Humboldtians in the theories of Petrograd and Moscow formalists. The talk is primarily devoted to various interpretations of Oleksandr Potebnia's concept of the "inner form of the word." Various attempts to use this concept contributed to the formation of the theory of poetic language, and led to the delineation of poetic semantics and verse semantics. Simultaneously, all branches of Russian formalism inherited and developed Potebnia's relational concept of form in general and "inner form" in particular. Another version of this theory was proposed by the antagonists among the formalists, from Viktor Shklovsky to Grigorii Vinokur, and from Boris Jarcho to Gustav Shpet.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Ilke Denizli by sending email to zid2000@columbia.edu

 

The Hundred Year Marathon: China's Secret Strategy

Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Columbia University Morningside Campus International Affairs Building, Room 918

Brown Bag Lecture with Michael Pillsbury, Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for Chinese Strategy, The Hudson Institute. Moderated by Andrew Nathan, Class of 1919 Professor of Political Science, Department of Political Science, Columbia University. No registration required.

Sponsored by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute

 

The Economic Outlook for Asia

Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Columbia University Morningside Campus Uris Hall, Room 301

Shang-Jin Wei, Chief Economist of the Asian Development Bank, will discuss the bank's just-released forecast for economic growth and inflation in Asian economies.

What you'll learn:

How new economic data affect the investment climate

Challenges and opportunities presented by a decline in oil prices

What new major reform efforts are underway

The role of financial development in economic growth and inclusion

Sponsored by the Chazen Institute of International Business, Columbia Business School.

For further information regarding this event, please contact The Chazen Institute by sending email to chazen@columbia.edu.

 

Infrastructure and Citizenship: The Politics of Transportation Reform in Mexico City

Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Columbia University Morningside Campus Avery Hall, Room 115

Part of the Latin Lab Brown Bag Series. A talk with Oscar Sosa, Doctoral Student at Department and Regional Planning, UC Berkeley.

For further information regarding this event, please contact ILAS by sending email to ilasRSVP@gmail.com

 

Whose Experiment?: Environmental Regulation, NGOs, and Protest Movements

Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 2:10pm - 3:10pm

Columbia University Morningside Campus International Affairs Building, Room 1219

This talk is part of the Harriman Institute's Core Project for 2014-15, titled "Learning from Transition: From the Local to the Global."

In late 1989 and early 1990, the dominant idea was that policymakers in Eastern Europe would be learning from the West. The term transition offered an image in which East Europeans were on a road to catching up with Western institutions which had earlier arrived at the right answers for the proper models of the relationship between markets and democracies. Twenty five years later, our goal is to consolidate existing research less about 1989 itself than about the past 25 years of experience with political and economic transformation. To do so, this component of the Harriman Core Project for 2014-15 will focus on how different actors are learning from each other. Who is paying attention to whom? And what new combinations are being cobbled together in this process?

 

Launch: BrazilTalk

Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Columbia University Morningside Campus International Affairs Building Room 802

Join ILAS, the Center for Brazilian Studies and the BrazilTalk initiative to the platform's Grand Launch.

BrazilTalk (braziltalk.org) is a non-partisan, not-for-profit website offering new perspectives about Brazilian issues through opinion articles, interviews, videos, graphics and events. Our contributors come from the academia, business, media, public sector and third sector.

Brazil Talk provides readers with original, current and engaging content in economics, national politics, culture, foreign affairs, and society. Our mission is to create an avant-garde global platform devoted to in-depth commentaries about Brazil in English. Founded by graduate students and supported by faculty members at the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) at Columbia University in the City of New York, Brazil Talk is an open collaborative space where contributors with demonstrated expertise in Brazilian affairs share their incisive perspectives and analyses.

Come share some ideas, discuss Brazil and learn about engagement opportunities.

Wine and cheese will be served.

 

Thursday, Apr 2nd

Emergent Forms of Religious Life in Contemporary Mexico

Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 9:00am - Friday, April 3, 2015 - 5:00pm
Columbia University Morningside Campus Buell Hall, Maison Francaise (Thursday, April 2) Knox Hall, Room 509 (Friday, April 3)

The period once glossed as Mexicos democratic transition (1976-2000), was an era of deep structural changes politically, economically, and socially at all levels of society. These changes are also manifest in the sphere of religious belief, organization, and practice. In many regions of Mexico, a field of religious choice and competition developed, seemingly in tandem with the new feeling of competition between political parties. On the other hand, the development of a drug economy, and government infiltration by drug organizations at local and in some instances state levels, has also transpired alongside the development of new religious sensitivities most famously in the Santa Muerte cult, but also in subcultures of drug organizations such as the Caballeros Templarios (Knights Templar) in Michoacn. Emergent Forms of Religious Life in Contemporary Mexico aims to develop a preliminary exploration of the broad theme of emergent religious forms in Mexican public life. We hope to address new narratives and social practices developed to cope with everyday life in a society that has undergone such rapid and deep transformation, the nature of engagement of contemporary religious organizations and trends in Mexican public life, and the proliferation of cult-like organizations that do not take on expressly religious forms, but may have kinship with them, such as Michoacns Knights Templar, Dianetics, or even the culture of pyramid scheme-like organizations such as Herbalife.

The full schedule, including the complete list of panelists and participants, is available at ircpl.org.

This conference is free and open to all.

Registration is appreciated, but not required. Please register now at ircpl.org.

Co-sponsored by the Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life and the Center for Mexican Studies at Columbia University.

 

The German Threat: Vargas' Nationalization Project and German Minorities

Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Columbia University Morningside Campus International Affairs Building, Room 802

The 1930s witnessed an unprecedented rise of nationalist ideas, which had a decisive impact on the way nations perceived themselves and related with others. Vargas Regime can be included in this trend, especially after 1937 when the previously constitutional ruler converted himself into a dictator. Brazil was, however, a nation of immigrants who, in different levels, remained connected with their roots abroad.

The aim of this talk is to analyze the interaction between the Brazilian authorities and one of these groups, namely the Germans, who due to their poor assimilation, became one of the main targets of Vargas' nationalization campaign.

For further information regarding this event, please contact ILAS by sending email toilasRSVP@gmail.com .

 

St. Petersburg to Sarajevo: Coming Out Under Fire: The LGBTI Human Rights Struggle for Dignity in Eastern Europe and Eurasia

Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 6:00pm - 7:30pm

Columbia University Morningside Campus International Affairs Building, Room 1219

Please join the Harriman Institute for a panel discussion featuring: Zdravko Cimbaljevic, Montenegrin and International LGBT activist Yelena Goltsman, Founder and Executive Director for RUSA LGBT Anna Kirey, Senior Program Officer, Sexual Health and Rights Project, Open Society Foundation Tanya Domi, Adjunct Professor, Harriman Institute Moderator: Jasmin Mujanovic, Visiting Scholar, Harriman Institute

For further information regarding this event, please contact Ilke Denizli by sending email to zid2000@columbia.edu.

 

Urgent Issues in Global Urbanism

Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 8:00pm - 9:30pm

Columbia University Morningside Campus 206 Low Library - Burden Room

An Exploration led by Saskia Sassen of the crucial ideas that are currently explored in global urbanism to tackle the urgent issues that we are facing.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Oscar Alvarez by sending email to oea2110@columbia.edu.

Beyond Death: The Politics of Suicide and Martyrdom in Korean History

Friday, April 3, 2015 - 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Columbia University Morningside Campus International Affairs Building, Room 918

Lecture with Hwasook Nam, University of Washington; Serk-Bae Suh, University of California, Irvine;Charles Kim, University of Wisconsin. Moderated by Jungwon Kim, Columbia University.

No registration required.

Co-sponsored by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, and the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Katherine Forshay by sending email tokdf2116@columbia.edu.

 

The Society of Fellows in the Humanities Presents Managing Borders

Friday, April 3, 2015 - 9:00am - Saturday, April 4, 2015 - 5:00pm
Columbia University Morningside Campus Heyman Center Common Room
The Society of Fellows in the Humanities presents "Managing Borders: An Interdisciplinary Conference on American Immigration Marking the 50th Anniversary of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965."

In October 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Immigration and Nationality Act. Abolishing the national origins quota system, which had heavily restricted immigration from Asia and southern and eastern Europe for decades, the act introduced new systems that placed preference on immigrants occupational qualifications and family ties with the United States. This new arrangement resulted in a significant expansion of immigration from Asia and Latin America. At the same time, by newly setting a numerical limit on immigration from the Western Hemisphere, which badly failed to cater to the need of immigration to the United States for people in Latin America, the act led to the increase of illegal entry from the region. The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, also known as the Hart-Celler Act, thus decisively shaped the patterns of immigration to the United States and global migration that still continue today. This conference aims to use the 50th anniversary of this! pivotal legislation in 2015 as an opportunity to explore the latest scholarship on American immigration, assess the state of the field, and identify new tasks and challenges for immigration scholars.

Coming from a wide range of academic disciplines, including history, literature, cultural studies, sociology, anthropology, political science, and law, participants in this interdisciplinary conference collectively seek to achieve a better understanding of issues and problems associated to American immigration today under the theme of Managing Borders. Broadly defined, Managing Borders encourages participants to examine the diverse roles of real and imaginative borders in the history of American immigration up to the present. How has the government developed and implemented policies for border control? How have immigrants crossed various kinds of borders and how were their border-crossing experiences like? How have social, cultural, economic, racial, and psychological factors shaped the relationship, a form of border, between citizens and non-citizens, between ethnic groups, or within a single ethnic group? How has immigration to the United States, or border-crossing t! o America, fitted into broader trends of global migration? How have scholars conceptualized various types of borders in the study of American immigration and global migration? Finally, what kinds of disciplinary borders now exist in migration scholarship, and how can we transcend them? As a whole, the conference hopes to provoke conversations that would lead the study of American immigration in an age that is simultaneously borderless and border-raising.
Nigeria: The New Pakistan or the End of Boko Haram?

Nigeria: The New Pakistan or the End of Boko Haram?

Two Wings of the Same Bird

Two Wings of the Same Bird