2017 Editorial Board

Editor-in-Chief

Matthew Zipf

Publisher

Anamaria lopez

 

Design editor

Theresa yang 

Marketing Director

Huhe yaN

arts editors

michelle huang

charly voelkel

lead web editor

poorvi bellur

Managing Editors

amanda kam

dimitrius keeler

shambhavi Tiwari 

karen yuan

Copy Chief

Maggie Toner

Senior Editors

vivian casillas

audrey deGuerrera

brian gao

belle harris

melissa ho

jahan nanji

sheena qiao

bani sapra

nina zweig

Copy Editors

sahana narayanan

song rhee

Events 02/02 - 02/08

Events 02/02 - 02/08

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Wednesday, February 4th

Chinese Dreams and Chinese Nightmares, 1989 to 2014

2:10pm - 4:00pm

International Affairs Building, Room 1219

Please join the Harriman Institute for a talk by Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Department of History, University of California Irvine. This talk is part of the Harriman Institute Core Project 2014-2015: Learning from Transition: From the Local to the Global.

How has the Chinese Communist Party stayed in power so long after similar organizations fell in Eastern and Central Europe?  Are the strategies that it has been using to deal with protest since 1989 still effective?  What makes Xi Jinping similar to and different from his immediate predecessors?  These are the sorts of questions the speaker will address, focusing in part on the different sorts of dreams that inspire hope and nightmares that cause anxiety among various groups within the People's Republic of China, from officials in Beijing, to students in Hong Kong, from migrant workers in Dongguan to Uyghurs in Urumqi.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Ilke Denizli by sending email tozid2000@columbia.edu .

Stalin's World: Geopolitics and Power

5:45pm - 7:30pm

International Affairs Building, Room 1501

Stephen Kotkin in Conversation with David Remnick

Stephen Kotkin is the John P. Birkelund Professor in History and International Affairs at Princeton University, where he has taught since 1989. He is also a Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He directs Princetons Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies program. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Times, among other publications, and is the author of several books, including Uncivil Society, Armageddon Averted, and Magnetic Mountain. His Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928 was published in November 2014.

David Remnick has been editor of The New Yorker since 1998 and a staff writer since 1992. Remnick began his reporting career as a staff writer at the Washington Post in 1982. In 1988, he started a four-year tenure as a Washington Post Moscow correspondent, an experience that formed the basis of his 1993 book on the former Soviet Union, Lenins Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire. In 1994, Lenins Tomb received both the Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction and a George Polk Award for excellence in journalism. Remnick has contributed to The New York Review of Books, Vanity Fair, Esquire, and The New Republic. He has been a Visiting Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and has taught at Princeton, where he received his B.A., in 1981, and at Columbia.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Ilke Denizli by sending email tozid2000@columbia.edu.

 

Thursday, February 5th

The Congress of Vienna 1814-1815: Making Peace after Global War (Day 1)

4:00pm - 7:00pm

Faculty House, 4th Floor

4:00-5:30pm: From Congress to Concert: Concepts and Institutions

Speakers:

Matthew Rendall, Lecturer in Politics and International Relations, University of Nottingham

Glenda Sluga, Professor of History, University of Sydney

Brian Vick, Associate Professor of History, Emory University

Discussants:

Robert Jervis, Professor of International Politics, Columbia University

Isser Woloch, Professor Emeritus of History, Columbia University

Chair: Gideon Rose, Editor, Foreign Affairs

5:45-7:00pm: Roundtable on the Legacies of the Congress: Perspectives from Historians and Practitioners-

Speakers:

Gary Bass, Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton

Mark Mazower, Professor of History, Columbia University

Wolfgang Petritsch, President, Austrian Marshall Plan Foundation

Chair: Victoria de Grazia, Professor of History, Director of the European Institute, Columbia University

For further information regarding this event, please contact Lily Glenn by sending email tolg2637@columbia.edu .

Register

 

10th Annual Lecture on Japanese Politics: New Directions in Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy

5:00pm - 6:30pm
Schapiro Center for Engineering and Physical Science Research Davis Auditorium, Room 412

Gerald L. Curtis, Burgess Professor of Political Science, Columbia University; Moderated by Hugh T. Patrick, R.D. Calkins Professor of International Business Emeritus; Director, Center on Japanese Economy and Business, Columbia Business School. Reception to follow. Registration required.

Co-sponsored by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute and the Center on Japanese Economy and Business, Columbia Business School.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Bennett Williams by sending email tobgw2118@columbia.edu .

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Citizenship between Empire and Nation: Remaking France and French Africa, 1945-1960

6:00pm - 8:00pm
East Gallery, Buell Hall

Frederick Cooper's Citizenship between Empire and Nation (Princeton UP, 2014) examines momentous changes in notions of citizenship, sovereignty, nation, state, and empire in France and French Africa in a time of acute uncertainty about the future of a world that had earlier been divided into colonial empires.

Frederick Cooper is a Professor of History at New York University and has been visiting professor at the cole des Hautes tudes en Sciences Sociales, the cole Normale Suprieure, and the Universit de Paris VII. His many books include Colonialism in Question and Empires in World History(Princeton).

Co-sponsored by the Columbia Maison Franaise and Institute of African Studies

 

For further information regarding this event, please contact Maison Events by sending email toll2787@columbia.edu.

Friday, February 6th

The Congress of Vienna 1814-1815: Making Peace after Global War (Day 2)

9:30am - 6:00pm
International Affairs Building, Room 1501

9:30-9:45am: Welcome by Victoria de Grazia, Professor of History, Director of the European Institute, Columbia University

9:45-11:15am: The New Security Regime

Speakers:

Beatrice A. de Graaf, Professor of History of International Relations & Global Governance, Utrecht University

Stella Ghervas, Visiting Scholar, Center for European Studies, Harvard University

Mark Jarrett, independent scholar, author of The Congress of Vienna and its Legacy

Discussants:

Richard Betts, Professor of War and Peace Studies, Columbia University

Jack Snyder, Professor of International Relations, Columbia University

11:30am1:00pm: Communicating the Congresss Values

Speakers:

Margaret Crosby-Arnold, Research Scholar, European Institute, Columbia University

Christian Cwik, Lecturer, European and Atlantic History, University of the West Indies

Glenda Sluga, Professor of History, University of Sydney

Discussants:

Susan Pedersen, Professor of History, Columbia University

Larry Woolf, Professor of History, New York University

2:304:00pm: Irrepressible Issues: Rogue Nations, Insubordinate Peoples, the Democratic Spirit

Speakers:

John Davis, Professor of History, University of Connecticut

Patrick Geoghegan, Associate Professor of History, Trinity College

Paul Lovejoy, Professor of History, York University

4:155:45pm: Concluding Roundtable

Speakers:

David Armitage, Professor of History, Harvard University

Patrick Cohrs, Professor of History and International Affairs, Yale University

For further information regarding this event, please contact Lily Glenn by sending email tolg2637@columbia.edu .

Click Here to Visit Website.

 

This list is drawn from the Columbia University Events Calendar 

 

Winds of Change from an Unlikely Place

Winds of Change from an Unlikely Place

Water Pressures