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Events 11/03 - 11/09

Events 11/03 - 11/09

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Monday, November 3rd

AgCenter Seminar

2:00pm - 3:00pm

Low Memorial Library Burden Room, #206

The Earth Institute's Agriculture and Food Security Center (AgCenter) presents "Elucidating Sustainable Agroecosystems Across Scales and Disciplines," with Johan Six, Full Professor, Sustainable Agroecosystems, Department of Environmental System Science, ETH, Zurich.

Dr. Six received his PhD in Soil Science in 1998 from Colorado State University. His PhD research was conducted at the Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory (NREL). His research focused on the mechanisms underlying greenhouse gas mitigation by no-tillage practices. Dr. Six remained as a Research Scientist at NREL from 1998 until 2002. He led and was involved in many projects investigating the effect of land use change and management on greenhouse gas fluxes in agricultural, grassland and forest ecosystems. At UCDavis (2002-2012), Dr. Six further developed this line of research with a focus on the feedbacks between ecosystem management options (e.g., tillage, cover cropping, green manuring, sustainable farming, and grazing), global change (e.g., elevated CO2 and climate change), and biogeochemical cycling. Since 2013, Dr. Six is the chair of the Sustainable Agroecosystems Group at ETH-zurich, where he has continued the research program developed at UCDavis, but with more of an emphasis on landscape analyses and global Food Security. More specifically, he studies the complex interactions between soil (e.g, structure, texture and mineralogy), plants (e.g., diversity, nutrient uptake, and root growth), soil biota (e.g. fungi, bacteria, and earthworms), and the carbon and nitrogen cycles in terrestrial ecosystems, especially agroecosystems. His general approach is to conduct experimental work from the micro- to landscape scale and subsequently integrate it with modeling to interpolate and extrapolate it to the regional and global scale. The modeling has also as goals to identify gaps in our knowledge, generate testable hypotheses, and test the mechanistic bases of biogeochemical models. Furthermore, bio-economic modeling is conducted in collaboration with economic and social scientist to holistically assess the sustainability of agriculture. The project sites span from small growers fields to intensively-farmed production systems to agricultural research stations.

Dr. Six is a Chancelors Fellow of the University of California Davis, a Fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Philippe Duchaufour medallist in Soil Science.

For more information on the AgCenter visit agriculture.columbia.edu For more information on the Earth Institute visit www.earth.columbia.edu For further information regarding this event, please contact Mary Pasquince by sending email to mp536@columbia.edu

Tuesday, November 4th

VOTE

Wednesday, November 5th

Critics and Analytics: Presentation of the Past in the 9/11 Museum

10:00am - 1:00pm

International Affairs Building, Room 918

Critics and Analytics: Presentation of the Past in the 9/11 Museum

Speakers: Charles Strozier, historian, psychoanalyst, author of Until the Fires Stop Burning; Jeffrey Alexander, sociologist, author of Narrating Trauma; Daphna Shohamy, cognitive neuroscientist on learning, memory and the brain; Thomas Lutz, Topography of Terror, historical museum on Nazi crimes, Berlin; Henry Rousso, historian of French public memory of World War II.

Moderator: Carol Gluck, historian.

Open to the public. No registration required.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Cory Winter by sending email tocw2847@columbia.edu or by calling 212-851-7293.

Click Here to Visit Website.

Origins of Environmental Law Lecture Series: The Clean Water Act: Conference with the House Public Works Committee

11:00am - 12:50pm

International Affairs Building, Room 407

The Earth Institute presents Origins of Environmental Law Lecture Series Description: Introduction to Early Environmental Legislation, Pre-1969.

This seminar is part of a semester-long lecture series entitled The Origins of Environmental Law: Regulation and Evolution. Leon G. Billings and Thomas C. Jorling are the two senior staff members who led the Senate environment subcommittee which originated and developed major environmental legislation in the 1970s, including the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Superfund Act. Over the course of a single decade, Congress enacted a series of environmental laws that defined the direction and character of environmental policy in the US and globally. Learn about the process that led to these seminal laws from the writers of the legislation themselves.

This lecture explores the Conference with the House Public Works Committee as it relates to the Clean Air Act- how it began, the nature of the political process, and personalities of the committee and other staff. It will go over the role of acting Chair Bob Jones, the House Hearings and Conference with the House, and the role of major federal assistance to construct municipal waste treatment plants.

RSVP is required for this event. Please note this lecture is part of a regularly scheduled course. Guests will join registered students in the class for the lecture and discussion.

For more information about the Earth Institute education programs and certificates, please click EARTH ED. For more information on the Earth Institute, please click earth.columbia.edu. For further information regarding this event, please contact Hayley Martinez by sending email to hmartinez@ei.columbia.edu .

Register

"The Menace of Unreality: How the Kremlin Weaponizes Information, Culture, and Money"

12:00pm - 1:00pm

International Affairs Building, Room 1219

Please join the Harriman Institute for a preview talk by Michael Weiss on his forthcoming Special Report, The Menace of Unreality: How the Kremlin Weaponizes Information, Culture and Money, co-authored by Peter Pomerantsev. The Report will be presented by The Interpreter, a project of Institute of Modern Russia on November 10th.

Michael Weiss is editor-in-chief of The Interpreter, as well as a columnist for Foreign Policy, the Daily Beast, and NOW Lebanon.

A longtime journalist, Weiss has covered the Syrian revolution from its inception, reporting from refugee camps in southern Turkey and from the frontlines of war-torn Aleppo. He has broken several news stories for Foreign Policy, including how Iran has given virtually free oil to the Assad regime in Syria (based on leaked state documents); how Angolas energy sector works closely with a Swiss commodities trader (and how an Angolan general profits from the relationship); and how Russia fired Grad missiles into eastern Ukraine.

He founded The Interpreter as a news and translation service in May 2013. In just over a year, the website has become a high-traffic resource for journalists, diplomats, and policymakers from around the world.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Ilke Denizli by sending email tozid2000@columbia.edu .

The Eastern Mediterranean and European Energy Landscape: Trends and Opportunities

3:00pm - 4:15pm

International Affairs Building, Room 1501

Please join the Center on Global Energy Policy and the Harriman Institute for a discussion with Prof. Yannis Maniatis, Greek Minister of Energy, Environment, and Climate Change, on the shifting energy dynamics in the Eastern Mediterranean and Europe. Minister Maniatis will discuss Greece's efforts to develop its domestic energy resources and its role in advancing domestic and regional energy security priorities. Specific questions to be addressed include: How can Greece contribute to the expansion of Europe's Southern Gas Corridor? What impacts will the recently-announced Trans-Adriatic Pipeline (TAP) have on Greece and the rest of Europe? And how can regional political dynamics hinder resource exploration and development? Alexander Cooley, Professor of Political Science, Barnard College, and Deputy Director for Social Sciences Programming at the Harriman Institute, will moderate a discussion following the presentation.

Registration is required for in-person attendance. It will also be livestreamed at: energypolicy.columbia.edu/watch (no registration is required to view the livestream). This event is open to press.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Ke Wei by sending email tokwei@columbia.edu .

Register

Is Evil Still a Meaningful Concept Today?

6:15pm - 8:15pm

Heyman Center for the Humanities 2nd Floor Common Room

Simona Forti will discuss her work and her new book, The New Demons. Rethinking Evil and Power Today, published by Stanford University Press. She will be in conversation with Adriana Cavarero, Professor of Political Philosophy at the Universit degli studi di Verona.

Simona Forti is Professor of History of Political Philosophy at the Universit del Piemonte Orientale, Italy. She graduated with a degree in Philosophy from the University of Bologna, and she received her PhD in the History of Political Thought from Turin University. She is a founding member of FINO, a PhD Program in Philosophy coordinated by the Northwestern Italian University Consortium. She served as the Italian member of the Coordinating International Committee of the European Science Foundation Network Activity on "The Politics and History of European Democratisation" (PHED) for the European Science Foundation. From 2003-2011 she was member of the jury for Der Hannah-Arendt Preis fr politischen Denken, Heinrich Bll Stiftung, Bremen and Berlin. She is standing President of the International Centre BIOS, research on biopolitics and bioethics, based at the Universit del Piemonte Orientale. She is known for her works on Hannah Arendts thought and on the philosophical idea of Totalitarianism and for her more recent work on Biopolitics and on the contemporary reshaping of the notion of Evil.

Adriana Cavarero is an Italian philosopher and feminist thinker. She holds the title of Professor of Political Philosophy at the Universit degli studi di Verona. She has also held visiting appointments at the University of California, Berkeley and Santa Barbara, at the New York University and Harvard. Cavarero is widely recognized in Italy, Europe and the English-speaking world for her writings on feminism and theories of sexual difference, on Plato, on Hannah Arendt, on theories of narration and on a wide range of issues in political philosophy and literature.

Event is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Heyman Center for the Humanities by sending email to heymancenter@columbia.org .

Click Here to Visit Website.

Southeast Asia and the United States

6:15pm - 7:30pm

International Affairs Building, Room 403

Talk with His Excellency Ashok Kumar Mirpuri, Singapore's Ambassador to the U.S. moderated byDuncan McCargo, Senior Research Affiliate, Weatherhead East Asian Institute; Professor of Political Science, University of Leeds. No registration required. Sponsored by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute and Southeast Asian Student Initiative (SEASI).

For further information regarding this event, please contact Lauren Mack by sending email to lem2111@columbia.edu .

Click Here to Visit Website.

Thursday, November 6th

A Global Agenda for Financial Stability: Have We Tamed the Too-Big-to-Fail Financial Institution?

9:00am - 1:30pm

Columbia Law School Jerome L. Greene Hall Annex

A Global Agenda for Financial Stability: Have We Tamed the Too-Big-To-Fail Financial Institution?

Thursday, November 6, 2014 9:00 a.m.1:30 p.m.

Columbia Law School Jerome Greene Hall Annex

MODERATORS

Patrick Bolton, Barbara and David Zalaznick Professor of Business; President of the American Finance Association

Anu Bradford, Henry L. Moses Professor of Law and International Organization; Director, European Legal Studies Center

Jeffrey N. Gordon, Richard Paul Richman Professor of Law; Co-Director, Richman Center for Business, Law, and Public Policy

9 a.m. Coffee and Registration

9:30 a.m. The Lessons Learned From the Financial Crisis

PANELISTS

Sheila C. Bair, Former Chair, U.S. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation; Chair, Systemic Risk Council

H. Rodgin Cohen, Senior Chairman, Sullivan & Cromwell

Paul Tucker, Former Deputy Governor, Bank of England; Senior Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard Business School

11:00 a.m. Coffee Break

11:20 a.m. Regulatory Responses Across the Atlantic

PANELISTS

John C. Coffee Jr., Adolf A. Berle Professor of Law, Columbia Law School

Dianne Dobbeck, Senior Vice President, Head of Supervisory Policy, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Emiliano Tornese, European Commission

12:30 p.m. The Challenges Ahead in View of Brisbane: A U.S. and E.U. Perspective

PANELISTS

Greg Baer, General Counsel, Corporate and Regulatory Law, JPMorgan Chase

David Schraa, Counsel, Institute of International Finance

Georges Ugeux, Lecturer-in-Law, Columbia Law School

Co-sponsored by the European Legal Studies Center and the Richard Paul Richman Center for Business, Law, and Public Policy

For further information regarding this event, please contact Eric Wetzer by sending email to ew102@columbia.edu or by calling 2128540084.

Register

Occupy Central: Hong Kong's Umbrella Movement

12:00pm - 1:30pm

International Affairs Building, Room 918

A talk with Jason Ng, lawyer and adjunct lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Hong Kong. Moderated byStephanie Balme, Alliance Visiting Professor of Law, School of Law, Columbia University. Co-sponsored by Asia Pacific Affairs Council (APAC)

For further information regarding this event, please contact Lauren Mack by sending email tolem2111@columbia.edu .

Click Here to Visit Website.

Who Are The Moldovans and Where Are They Heading? A Discussion on Identity, Human Rights, and Aspirations of the Citizen of the Republic of Moldova

12:00pm - 1:00pm

International Affairs Building, Room 1219

Please join the Harriman Institute for a discussion with Iuliana Marcinschi on human rights issues in Moldova. Although the Republic of Moldova gained independence 23 years ago, the institutions necessary to ensure the rule of law and human rights protection have failed to do so.  High levels of migration and human trafficking, intolerance and discrimination, and ethnic and religious hostilities remain sources of division within society.  Moldovan politicians rarely listen to their electorate - so what do Moldovans have to say on their own behalf?  This is the question that Human Rights Information Center has sought to answer.  A brief talk on the report's findings.

Iuliana Marcinschi is the director of Centrul de Informare in domeniul Drepturilor Omului (Human Rights Information Center - CIDO), an NGO for the promotion of human rights and democracy in the Republic of Moldova. CIDO works on a range of human rights issues in Moldova, focusing primarily on the rights of women, LGBT individuals, ethnic and religious minorities, and the right to education for vulnerable groups. Current work focuses on the implementation of Moldovas National Human Rights Action Plan (NHRAP) and analyzing progress made on the NHRAP Moldova for an alternative report to be submitted in advance of Moldovas review before the Universal Periodic Review in 2016.  She is also a 2014 advocate for Columbia University's Human Rights Advocates Program.

Previously, Iuliana held positions with the National Youth Council and served in an advisory position with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). In 2011, Iuliana presented an alternative report on discrimination in Moldova to the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination in Geneva on behalf of the Non-Discrimination Coalition. In addition to her duties at CIDO, Iuliana serves as the Project Coordinator for the National Partnership for Equal Rights project with the American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative in Moldova, focused on strengthening the capacity of LGBT and human rights groups in the country.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Ilke Denizli by sending email tozid2000@columbia.edu .

Click Here to Visit Website.

Social Enterprise and Cross Cultural Management with Brazil

1:00pm - 2:00pm

International Affairs Building, Room 802

Talk with Professor David Lavin. Part of the Brazil Brown Bag Seminar Series.

For further information regarding this event, please contact David Luna by sending email todl2714@columbia.edu

Open Economies, Closed Polities: Financial Globalization and Authoritarian Politics with Evidence from Russia

2:15pm - 3:30pm

International Affairs Building, Room 1201

Please join the Harriman Institute for a talk by Igor Logvinenko, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Harriman Institute, as he discusses the conditions under which non-democracies may opt for financial openness.

Financial globalization created immense opportunities for enrichment and power consolidation for the authoritarian elites, but it also complicated the task of governing these regimes. Under what condition do nondemocracies opt for financial openness? How are these decisions related to the tactics these regimes employ to remain in power? How does the nature of the asset base in the economy impact these decisions?

In this talk, I present a theoretical framework that endogenizes financial openness policies in a model that accounts for the profit opportunities from openness and the risks associated with increased economic volatility. I argue that when rulers consider adopting financial openness policies, they make sure their are the chief beneficiary of the openness; and they also take into account their ability to maintain political stability after openness policies are implemented. Greater financial openness is a double-edged sword: it can increase the value of  assets, but it can also make the economy more susceptible to external crises. Capacity to use distributive policies to deal with political instability resulting from greater exposure to global financial markets allows authoritarian regimes to afford more financial openness.

I illustrate this argument using the case of capital account deregulation in Russia, where a combination of control over country-specific wealth and a developed capacity for redistribution allowed an authoritarian regime to have it all, that is to maintain both openness and political stability.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Ilke Denizli by sending email tozid2000@columbia.edu

Sustainable Development Seminar Series: Ebola and the Politics of Pandemic

4:00pm - 6:00pm

Alfred J. Lerner Hall, Satow Room

The Earth Institute presents the first of the 2014-2015 Sustainable Development Seminar Series, Ebola and the Politics of Pandemic, with Irwin Redlener, Director, National Center for Disaster Preparedness and the Program on Child Well-Being and Resilience, The Earth Institute; Professor of Health Policy and Management, Columbia University; Co-Founder and President, Childrens Health Fund; Amy Fairchild, Professor of Sociomedical Sciences, mailman School of Public Health; Jeff Schlegelmilch, Managing Director for Strategic Planning and Operations, National Center for Disaster Preparedness, Earth Institute, Columbia University and Kavita Sivaramakrishnan, Assistant Professor of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University.

Beyond urgent medical and humanitarian consequences and response demands, the growing Ebola crisis has serious implications for governments, the private sector, and public messengers. This session will explore how money, power, and media affect -- and are affected by -- pandemics and other disaster events, how each relate to a society's extent of preparedness or panic, and lessons learned for sustainable development.

Open to the public. RSVP required. Photo ID required for building access.

For more information on the National Center for Disaster Preparedness, please click NCDP.

For more information on the Earth Institute, please click EARTH.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Pamela Vreeland by sending email to pvreeland@ei.columbia.edu .

Register

The North Korean Human Rights Conundrum

4:00pm - 5:30pm

International Affairs Building, Room 918

"The North Korean Human Rights Conundrum" Greg Scarlatoiu, Executive Director of the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea Thursday, November 6, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM 918 International Affairs Building No registration required.

Co-sponsored by the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Institute for the Study of Human Rights, APEC Study Center, and the Weatherhead East Asian Institute

For further information regarding this event, please contact Jooyeon Kim by sending email to jk2857@columbia.edu or by calling 212-854-1728.

Click Here to Visit Website.

Local Conflicts as a Global Challenge

5:00pm - 7:00pm

Earl Hall Auditorium

The Earth Institute, the Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life, the Office of the University Chaplain, the Institute for the Study of Human Rights, and the Department of Religion, Columbia University present "Local Conflicts as a Global Challenge," with George Rupp, President Emeritus and Adjunct Professor of Religion, Public Health, and International Affairs, Columbia University.

Open to the public.

For more information on the Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life visit IRCPL

For more information on the Office of the University Chaplain visit Earl Hall

For more information the the Department of Religion visit Religion

For further information regarding this event, please contact Earth Institute Events by sending email to events@ei.columbia.edu

Life Outsourced: Globalization and Transnational Surrogacy in India

6:00pm - 8:00pm

Heyman Center for the Humanities 2nd Floor Common Room

Shamita Das Dasgupta and Sayantani Dasgupta will discuss the increasingly commercial practice of transnational surrogacy, with a particular focus on India. Filmmaker and producer Vaishali Sinha will show clips from her film "Made in India."

In the twenty-first century, parenthood is no longer achieved only through gestation, adoption, or traditional surrogacy, but also via assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs), where science and technology play lead roles. Furthermore, in a globalized world economy, where the movement and transfer of people and commodities are increasing to serve the interests of capitalism, gamete donation and surrogate birth can traverse innumerable geographic, socio-economic, racialized, and political borderlands. Thus, reproduction itself can be outsourced.

Following the lecture, we invite all attendees to a University Seminar Dinner at Faculty House at Columbia. The cost of the dinner is $25.00, payable by check at the dinner to Columbia University Seminars. RSVP for the dinner at Eventbrite link.

The event before the dinner is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Heyman Center for the Humanities by sending email to heymancenter@columbia.org .

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The Poisoned Madeleine: Food, Family, History in the USSR

6:00pm - 7:00pm

International Affairs Building, Room 1512

Please join the Harriman Institute for a talk by Anya von Bremzen, award-winning author of Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking: A Memoir of Food and Longing.

What was it like to live in a country where every edible morsel carried an emotional and political meaning?  From Lenin to Stalin, from Khrushchev to Gorbachev, award-winning Anya von Bremzen explains the complex and tragic history of the Soviet twentieth century through the prism of food.

Anya von Bremzen is one of the most accomplished food writers of her generation: the winner of three James Beard awards; a contributing editor at Travel + Leisure magazine; and the author of five acclaimed cookbooks, among them Please to the Table: The Russian Cookbook.  Her latest book, Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking: A Memoir of Food and Longing (Crown) has been described by the New York Review of Books as "a painstakingly researched and beautifully written cultural history."

For further information regarding this event, please contact Ilke Denizli by sending email tozid2000@columbia.edu .

Click Here to Visit Website.

Inaugural China Energy Conference by The Earth Institute's China Sustainability Program

6:15pm - 8:00pm

Low Memorial Library Room 207

The new program created by Prof. Manuel Pinho and Prof. Andr Corra d'Almeida - The Earth Institute's China Sustainability Project - invites you to the Inaugural China Energy Symposium on Nov. 6th, at 6:15pm at Low Library, Faculty Room. Prof. Manuel Pinho will moderate discussions with Prof. Stephen Roach from Yale University on "US and China Codependency" and with Prof. Nobuo Tanaka from University of Tokyo on "Energy and Sustainability Challenges for China and Asia". Light refreshments will be served.

Registration for this event is highly recommended.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Maggie Lin by sending email tozl2217@columbia.edu .

Register

"1971" Screening and Discussion on Surveillance

7:00pm - 9:00pm

Dodge Hall, Davis Auditorium

On March 8, 1971 eight ordinary citizens broke into an FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania, took hundreds of secret files, and shared them with the public. They exposed the FBIs vast and illegal regime of spying and intimidation of Americans exercising their First Amendment rights.

"1971" tells this fascinating story through a combination of exclusive interviews, rare primary documents, recreations, and national news footage, but also serves as a haunting echo t! o todays questions of privacy in the era of government surveillance.

Following the screening there will be a discussion with with director, Johanna Hamilton; producers, Maureen Ryan (Film Faculty) and Marilyn Ness (Adjunct Film Faculty); Todd Gitlin (Journalism Faculty); journalist and author of The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover's Secret FBI Betty Medsger; and John and Bonnie Raines.

Free and Open to the Public.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Daisy Nam by sending email to arts@columbia.edu .

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Postcolonial Citizens and Ethnic Migration: A Comparative Look at the Netherlands in the Age of Globalization

7:00pm - 10:00pm

Deutsches Haus

Dr. Sharpe will talk about the politics of international migration around postcolonial citizen and coethnic immigrants and what limits or facilitates their political incorporation and political transnationalism in liberal democratic host societies. To examine this, Dr. Sharpe will focus on post-colonial citizen Dutch Caribbean and other immigrants in the Netherlands.

The Netherlands and other countries maintained active government sponsored programs for their citizens to emigrate to other countries in North and So! uth America and elsewhere well into the 20th century. Similar institutions and practices used to facilitate the emigration of Dutch and Japanese citizens are currently being used for the repatriation of guest workers and their descendants. Dr. Sharpe will discuss what this means for the liberal democratic state.

Michael Orlando Sharpe is Assistant Professor of Political Science at York College/City University of New York. He holds a Ph.D. from the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York. He holds a Master of International Affairs degree from Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs, and a Graduate Diploma in International Law and Organization for Development from the Institute of Social Studies in The Hague, The Netherlands.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Wijnie de Groot by sending email to wed23@columbia.edu

Friday, November 7th

The Energy and Climate Nexus

9:30am - 11:00am

Columbia University Morningside Campus Faculty House, Seminar Room

Please join the Center on Global Energy Policy for a forum on The Energy-Climate Nexus. This event will examine the various changes to our energy system that could help keep climate change below a two degree threshold and help meet the goal of a sustainable energy future, including:

- Significantly increasing renewable energy deployment; - Accelerating Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS), and negative carbon emissions technologies; - Deploying next generation nuclear technology.

Center Fellow Nobuo Tanaka, former Executive Director, International Energy Agency (IEA), will offer brief framing remarks. Center Director Jason Bordoff will then moderate a discussion with:

  • Dr. Klaus Lackner, Director of the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions, and Professor at the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, and former Professor of Geophysics and Director of the Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy at Columbia University;
  • Ted Nordhaus, Chairman, The Breakthrough Institute
  • Nobuo Tanaka, and;
  • Ethan Zindler, Head of Policy Analysis, Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

Registration is required. This event is open to press. It will also be livestreamed at: energypolicy.columbia.edu/watch (no registration is required to view the livestream) For more information contact: energypolicy@columbia.edu

For further information regarding this event, please contact Ke Wei by sending email tokw2373@columbia.edu .

Register

The Society of Fellows in the Humanities Presents: Gauri Viswanathans Masks of Conquest at 25

9:30am - 5:30pm

Heyman Center for the Humanities 2nd Floor Common Room

The Heyman Center hosts an all-day conference celebrating the twenty-fifth anniversary of Gauri Viswanathan's Masks of Conquest: Literary Study and British Rule in India. Viswanathans book changed the way we think about English Literature as a "discipline" -- both educational and colonial; it continues to be one of the most important works on the teaching of English in colonial India, and one of the most important analyses for the idea of literature as a conscious strategy of hegemony. In this commemorative event, sixteen of her former students, along with other scholars of postcoloni! al thought, will give short papers that consider the legacy of this work.

Event is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Heyman Center for the Humanities by sending email to heymancenter@columbia.org .

Click Here to Visit Website.

Michel Foucault: The Late Lectures

3:00pm - 5:30pm

East Gallery, Buell Hall

A panel discussion with Seyla Benhabib, Franois Ewald, Bernard E. Harcourt, George Kateb, and Emmanuelle Saada

In his late Collge de France lectures, Michel Foucault opened up new paths for research, what he so often referred to as "des pistes de recherche," many of which have only come to light now as a result of the recent publication of the lectures. Ranging from the concept of security to the notion of truth-telling, to the relationship between veridiction and juridiction, to the arts of governing, the hermeneutics of the self, and the notion of "voluntary inservitude," the late lectures represent a font of new material to allow us to think with Foucault. At the same time, they offer a new lens through which to reread the earlier published works, from the History of Madness, though Discipline and Punish, to the History of Sexuality. This colloquium will discuss a number of the ideas and concepts that were born and sketched out in the lectures, but that remain today still to be explored.

Event co-sponsored by the Columbia Maison Franaise, Center for Contemporary Critical Thought and Heyman Center for the Humanities

For further information regarding this event, please contact Maison Events by sending email toll2787@columbia.edu .

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Film in Putin's Russia: Conformism and Resistance

4:00pm - 5:00pm

International Affairs Building, Room 1219

Please join the Harriman Institute for a talk by acclaimed Russian film critic and writer, Anton Dolin.

Anton Dolin has spent the last fifteen years working in a variety of fields, including national radio, television, and print media.  He has published a number of articles in Gazeta, Expert, Moscow News, Vedemosti,Iskusstvo Kino and Afisha.  He has also published several books, including Lars von Trier: Control Works (2004), Takeshi Kitano: Childhood's Years (2006), Catch-XXI: Cinema of Our Century (2010), and German (2011).  He has won three professional awards from the Guild of Russian Film Critics and a "Triumph" prize for his writing.  Dolin currently resides in Moscow. Please note that this talk will be held in Russian and simultaneously translated into English.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Ilke Denizli by sending email tozid2000@columbia.edu .

Click Here to Visit Website.

Author Event - Capitalism v. Democracy by Timothy Kuhner

6:00pm - 7:00pm

Columbia University Morningside Campus Lerner Hall, Bookstore

Join us at the Columbia University Bookstore as we host Timothy Kuhner, an Associate Professor of Law at Georgia State University. His new book, "Capitalism v. Democracy: Money in Politics and the Free Market Constitution" puts campaign finance into a vibrant political and historical context and shines a nonpartisan light on how political spending is turning American democracy into a marketplace. "Capitalism v. Democracy" offers the key to understanding why corporations are now citizens, money i! s political speech, limits on corporate spending are a form of censorship, democracy is a free market, and political equality and democratic integrity are unconstitutional constraints on money in politics.

This event is free and open to the public at the Columbia University Bookstore.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Sarah Haze by sending email tobkstore707@bncollege.com or by calling 2128544265.

Click Here to Visit Website.

Film Fridays - The Rise of ISIS

6:00pm - 8:00pm

Pulitzer Hall 3rd Floor Lecture Hall

Open to the Public.

Join us for a screening of Frontline's "The Rise of ISIS" with Director/Correspondent, Martin Smith, winner 2014 John Chancellor Award. Smith, who was in Iraq as recently as this summer, will give his first hand views on how the country has come undone post-American withdrawal. What's next for ISIS? Join us for pizza, and a frank conversation. Pizza will be served. There's also a trivia contest. Brought to you by The duPont-Columbia Awards and The J School's Documentary Project. #cujfridays

For further information regarding this event, please contact MaryAnn Talavera by sending email tomt2523@columbia.edu .

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This list is drawn from the Columbia University Events Calendar

Events: 11/10 - 11/16

Events: 11/10 - 11/16

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