2017 Editorial Board

Editor-in-Chief

Matthew Zipf

Publisher

Anamaria lopez

 

Design editor

Theresa yang 

Marketing Director

Huhe yaN

arts editors

michelle huang

charly voelkel

lead web editor

poorvi bellur

Managing Editors

amanda kam

dimitrius keeler

shambhavi Tiwari 

karen yuan

Copy Chief

Maggie Toner

Senior Editors

vivian casillas

audrey deGuerrera

brian gao

belle harris

melissa ho

jahan nanji

sheena qiao

bani sapra

nina zweig

Copy Editors

sahana narayanan

song rhee

Events 10/06 - 10/12

Events 10/06 - 10/12

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Monday, October 6, 2014

The Turks Were Killing the Body, the Austrians Kill the Soul: Suffering as a Patriotic Sentiment in Bosnia, 1840-1914

1:00pm-3:00pm

International Affairs Building, Room 1201

Please join the Harriman Institute and East Central European Center for a discussion about "Suffering as a Patriotic Sentiment in Bosnia between 1840-1914" with Edin Hajdarpasic, Assistant Professor of History at Loyola University Chicago.

In the wake of Romanticism, early nationalist projects proclaimed a new age of happiness of the folk, yet by the middle of the nineteenth century, national activists across Europe were busily chronicling the agonizing pain of their miserable homelands.  Instead of dismissing suffering as a mere rhetorical convention, this talk argues that the monumental body of literature on this national suffering carried immense political significance, underpinning the constitution and mobilization of South Slavic nationalist sentiments throughout the nineteenth century.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Filip Tucek by sending email to ft2439@columbia.edu

Critical Perspectives --- Before and After the 19th Party Congress: Political Trends in Xi Jinping's First and Second Terms

4:10pm - 6:00pm

International Affairs Building, Room 918

Part of the Human Rights in East Asia and Beyond: Critical Perspectives series, the Weatherhead East Asian Institute's year-long critical examination of the issue of human rights. Li Weidong is a visiting scholar at the Institute for the Study of Human Rights. This talk will be presented in Mandarin Chinese with simultaneous interpretation provided by Andrew Nathan, Class of 1919 Professor of Political Science, at Columbia University. Sponsored by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Lauren Mack by sending email tolem2111@columbia.edu .

Click Here to Visit Website.

Columbia Voting Week: Running for Public Office

6:00pm - 7:30pm

Lerner Hall, Satow Room

What is it like to run for office? What are the challenges? What does it take to be successful? Peel back the curtain with insights from former NYC Mayor David Dinkins and a panel of Nily Rozic, Mark Levine, Jamal Nelson and Lincoln Restler, moderated by Dean Kathryn Yatrakis, as they discuss the greatest challenges to running for public office, and what the future holds for the election process.

Opening: Merit Janow, Dean, School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), Columbia University. Keynote Address: David N. Dinkins, Former Mayor of New York City and Professor in the Professional Practice of Public Affairs, SIPA, Columbia University. Moderator: Dean of Academic Affairs, Kathryn Yatrakis. Panelists: Nily Rozic, New York State Assemblywoman, Mark Levine, New York City Councilman, Jamal Nelson, Senior Director, Regional Impact, Leadership for Educational Equity andLincoln Restler, currently a senior adviser in the administration of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio. Restler served as de Blasios Brooklyn campaign strategist for the 2013 election.

To attend, please RSVP here: https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pe/9951560.

Co-Sponsors: OMA, SIPA, Student Engagement, CPU.

Reception to follow.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Kevin Gully by sending email to kg2515@columbia.edu or by calling 212-851-0264.

The Bettman Lectures: Lina Bolzoni, "Memory Palaces: The Renaissance and the Contemporary World"

6:00pm - 8:00pm

Schermerhorn Hall, Room 612

Lina Bolzoni is Professor of Italian Literature at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa, where she is the founding director of the Center for Data Processing of Texts and Images in the Literary Tradition. Professor Bolzoni is also the Global Distinguished Professor of Italian Studies at New York University. Professor Bolzonis research interests include the art of memory, portraiture within the poetic and figurative traditions, sacred and profane oratory, and the relationship between literature and philosophy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Inaugurated in 2004, the Bettman Lectures are an annual program of monthly lectures in art history sponsored by the Department of Art History and Archaeology. Endowed with a bequest from Linda Bettman, a former graduate student of the department, the lectures are named in her honor.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Amanda Young by sending email toary2110@columbia.edu or by calling 212-854-4505.

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Columbia Voting Week: Political Consulting and Running Elections

4:00pm - 5:30pm

Lerner Hall, Room 569

An industry that has grown exponentially in the past decade, political consultants now play essential roles in managing and advising virtually every component of a campaign. Come to hear experts examine the current state of this booming industry and its impact on the democratic process. Panelists include Jef Pollock, founder and president of Global Strategy Group, Alexis Grenell, independent political consultant, Basil Smikle, SIPA lecturer and political strategist, and Lincoln Mitchell, National Political Correspondent for the New York Observer. The panel will be moderated by Political Science Professor Robert Shapiro.

To attend, please RSVP to https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pe/9951559.

Co-Sponsors: School of General Studies, SIPA, Student Engagement, CPU.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Kevin Gully by sending email tokg2515@columbia.edu or by calling 212-851-0264.

Click Here to Visit Website.

The Historical Development of International Criminal Law, 1919-1950: Some Basic Arguments

4:30pm - 6:30pm

Faculty House

The Columbia University Seminar on Twentieth Century Politics and Society presents:

"The Historical Development of International Criminal Law, 1919-1950:  Some Basic Arguments"

A talk by Mark Lewis

Free & open to the Public Columbia University Faculty House

Mark Lewis is Assistant Professor of History at the College of Staten Island, CUNY. He has diverse interests in European and world history, including the development of the laws of war and international criminal law; the role of non-governmental organizations in shaping law and politics; and the history of Germany, Austria, and the Balkans in the 19th and 20th centuries.

His new book, The Birth of the New Justice: The Internationalization of Crime and Punishment, 1919-1950 (Oxford University Press, 2014), explains attempts to establish international criminal courts and build the field of international criminal law from the end of World War One to the beginning of the Cold War. The manuscript won the Wiener Library's Fraenkel Prize in 2013. He is also the co-author of Himmlers Jewish Tailor: The Story of Jacob Frank, Holocaust Survivor from Lublin (Syracuse University Press, 2000).

An optional dinner directly follows the talk. All are welcome to come. We will dine in Faculty House at 6:30 pm. Meals, buffet style, cost $25 (payment by check only), and wine comes compliments of the seminar. Please sign up for dinner at saw2156@columbia.edu and provide two days' notice if you cannot attend.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Stephen Wertheim by sending email tosaw2156@columbia.edu

Black Feminist Futures and the Practice of Fugitivity

6:30pm - 8:00pm

Barnard College James Room, 4th Floor Barnard Hall

What kinds of practice create possibilities for new feminist futures? How do our everyday engagements with power complicate how we understand feminist struggle? Tina Campt uses black-feminist concepts to challenge the notion that resistance is the only way to understand the interplay between marginalized subjects and power. Focusing on archival photographs of black communities in diaspora, she explores the daily practices of black subjects whose struggles are often overlooked in an emphasis on collective and individual acts of resistance.The concept of fugitivity or taking flight emerges as a signature idiom of black diasporic culture. This can be a meaningful pathway for realizing the futures articulated by black feminist theory.

Tina Campt is Ann Whitney Olin professor of Africana and Womens Gender and Sexuality Studies, and newly appointed co-director of the Barnard Center for Research on Women. She is the author of Other Germans: Black Germans and the Politics of Race, Gender and Memory in the Third Reich and Image Matters: Archive, Photography and the African Diaspora in Europe.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Lindsay Stuffle by sending email tolstuffle@barnard.edu or by calling 212-854-2037.

Click Here to Visit Website.

Columbia Voting Week: Political Engagement, Advocacy, and Public Policy

7:00pm - 8:30pm

Lerner Hall, Party Space

In a democratic society, the engagement of people with their politicians is key. Learn from panelists Dick Dadey, Marcia Bystryn, Paul Steely White, and Nicholas Turner about what political engagement looks like today and the impact advocacy can have in impacting the political process.

Panelists: Dick Dadey, executive director of Citizens Union, a good government group, Marcia Bystryn, president of New York League of Conservation Voters, Paul Steely White executive director of Transportation Alternatives, and Sayu Bhojwani, founding Director of the New American Leaders Project.

Moderator: Ester R. Fuchs, Professor of International and Public Affairs and Political Science, Columbia University.

Reception to follow.

To attend, please RSVP

Co-sponsors: Student EngagementSIPA

For further information regarding this event, please contact Kevin Gully by sending email tokg2515@columbia.edu or by calling 212-851-0264.

Click Here to Visit Website.

 

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Origins of Environmental Law Lecture Series: The Solid Waste Disposal Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

11:00am - 12:50pm

International Affairs Building, Room 407

The Earth Institute presents Origins of Environmental Law Lecture Series Description: Introduction to Early Environmental Legislation, Pre-1969.

This seminar is part of a semester-long lecture series entitled The Origins of Environmental Law: Regulation and Evolution. Leon G. Billings and Thomas C. Jorling are the two senior staff members who led the Senate environment subcommittee which originated and developed major environmental legislation in the 1970s, including the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Superfund Act. Over the course of a single decade, Congress enacted a series of environmental laws that defined the direction and character of environmental policy in the US and globally. Learn about the process that led to these seminal laws from the writers of the legislation themselves.

This session will discuss the Solid Waste Disposal Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976; the establishment of legal jurisdiction; and open dumps. It will examine national policy as it moved from a strategy of disposal to one of recycle, reuse, recovery and conservation, and the speakers will cover how the rules at the local, state and federal level changed to do this. They will then look at the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency.

RSVP is required for this event. Please note this lecture is part of a regularly scheduled course. Guests will join registered students in the class for the lecture and discussion.

For more information about the Earth Institute education programs and certificates, please click EARTH ED.

For more information on the Earth Institute, please click earth.columbia.edu.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Hayley Martinez by sending email tohmartinez@ei.columbia.edu .

Havana: Past, Present, and Future

12:00pm - 1:30pm

International Affairs Building, Room 802

Miguel Coyula is an architect, urban planner, and professor at the University of Havana. The capital city of Havana, home to 2.1 million people, according to Professor Coyula has become a place to live but not a place for living.

Coyula, whose scholarship has chronicled the history of Cuban architecture since the colonial era, has noted that thanks to government subsidies, home ownership in Havana is extremely highabout 87%. However, because the average house is 75 years old and maintenance subsidies are nonexistent, many residents homes are in great despair.

For further information regarding this event, please contact David Luna by sending email todl2714@columbia.edu

Rethinking Knowledge: Global Governance

1:30pm - 3:30pm

The Heyman Center, Second Floor Common Room

- Mark Mazower, Ira D. Wallach Professor of History - Partha Chatterjee, Professor of Anthropology and of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies - Katharina Pistor, Michael I. Sovern Professor of Law, Columbia Law School

In October 2014, the Committee on Global Thought will launch the Global Think-ins, vehicles for generating new ideas and perspectives on issues of major global concern, with a series entitled, "Rethinking Knowledge." Although universities are designed to generate and disseminate knowledge, rarely do we reflect on what counts as knowledge or evidence, what lends credence to theory, or what shape that knowledge must take to grasp a changing world. Rethinking Knowledge poses such questions across the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, with an eye toward redefining how urgent matters are addressed in a globalizing world.

The first event in this series, "Rethinking Knowledge: Global Governance," will address the past, present, and future of attempts to "govern the world" (Mark Mazower) from a variety of perspectives and at a number of scales. From taking stock of past and present efforts, to examining the assumptions built into the very premise, to speculating on the necessary reconfiguration of academic disciplines, this Think-In aims at a free flowing exchange in which the contours of the problem are sketched and possible models are tested.

With the support of The Heyman Center for the Humanities.

Registration not required.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Committee on Global Thought by sending email to globalthought@columbia.edu or by calling 212-851-7292.

Around 1948: Human Rights and Global Transformation

3:00pm - 5:00pm

Pulitzer Hall (Journalism School), Third Floor Lecture Hall

Leading scholars in conversation about global developments in 1948 involving human rights, featuring:Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Modern Arab Studies, Columbia University; Lydia H. Liu, Wun Tsun Tam Professor of the Humanities, Columbia University; Samuel Moyn, Professor of Law and History, Harvard University; and Deborah Nelson, Associate Professor of English, University of Chicago.

Moderated by Eugenia Lean, Associate Professor of Modern Chinese History and Director of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University. Co-sponsored by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, the Center for International History, Critical Inquiry, the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, the Department of History, the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, and the Middle East Institute.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Lauren Mack by sending email tolem2111@columbia.edu .

Dilemmas of Campaigning and Governing in the United States: A Conversation with Governor Lincoln D. Chafee

4:00pm - 5:30pm

Teatro, Italian Academy

This World Leaders Forum program titled, Dilemmas of Campaigning and Governing in the United States: A Conversation with Governor Lincoln D. Chafee, will feature a discussion with Lincoln D. Chafee, Governor of Rhode Island, and the following participants:

Introduction: David Johnston, Professor of Political Science, Columbia University in the City of New York

Interlocutor: Ester Fuchs, Professor of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University in the City of New York

The discussion will be followed by a question and answer session with the audience. A reception will follow.

Co-sponsored by Columbia Voting Week 2014 and The Department of Political Science.

Online registration is required and currently open. To register please click here.

For further information regarding this event, please contact World Leaders Forum by sending email toworldleaders@columbia.edu or by calling 212-851-7421.

Register

Fifth Annual N.T. Wang Distinguished Lecture: The Chinese Economy: Boom or Bust

5:30pm - 8:30pm

Pulitzer Hall (Journalism School), Third Floor Lecture Hall

Lawrence J. Lau, Ralph and Claire Landau Professor of Economics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Lulu Chow Wang Senior Visiting Scholar, Chazen Institute of International Business, Columbia University. Co-sponsored by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute and the Chazen Institute of International Business.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Lauren Mack by sending email tolem2111@columbia.edu .

Click Here to Visit Website.

Panel Discussion & Reception: Suprematism, Unovis and Lazar Khidekel

6:00pm - 7:30pm

International Affairs Building, Room 918

Please join the Harriman Institute and the Russian-American Cultural Center (RACC) for a panel discussion and reception celebrating the new exhibit, Suprematism, UNOVIS and Lazar Khidekel, as we commemorate 100 years of Suprematism, 95 years of UNOVIS (Affirmers of the New Art) and the 110th Anniversary of the birth of Lazar Khidekel (1904-1986)--the Suprematist artist, visionary architect, and founding member of the UNOVIS group. The reception will take place after the discussion, in the exhibition space of the Harriman Atrium (International Affairs Building, 12th floor).

The discussion will explore the various aspects of Suprematism, including the UNOVIS educational system and the development of Suprematist painting in the works of the younger UNOVIS generation. It will also examine Lazar Khidekel's Suprematist painting and his role in the transition of Suprematism from a two-dimensional artform to a movement that found its expression in real life--visible today in architecture, the processes of urbanization, and the futuristic yet environmentally conscious city planning of the period.

Panel participants include: Dr. Regina Khidekel, Curator and President of the Lazar Khidekel Society, and Director of the Russian-American Cultural Center in New York (RACC); Anna Bokov, Ph.D. Candidate;Masha Chlenova, Museum of Modern Art; and Dr. Xenia Vytuleva, Adjust Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation at Columbia University.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Ilke Denizli by sending email tozid2000@columbia.edu .

Click Here to Visit Website.

The Rise of ISIS

8:00pm

Hamilton 503

Interested in learning about ISIS? Have an idea or two of your own about the whole matter? Join us for a discussion with SIPA Professor Naomi Weinberger on ISIS, global security, and the current state of the Middle East. Prof. Weinberger's presentation will be followed by Q&A and student-led discussions.

Co-Sponsors: Columbia International Relations Council and Association - CIRCA Columbia Political Union (CPU) (Others TBD)

https://www.facebook.com/events/545552388879242/

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Birthright Crisis: The Power and Paradoxes of Media Advocacy

12:00pm - 2:00pm

Barnard College BCRW, 101 Barnard Hall

After a September 2013 court ruling stripped citizenship from thousands of Dominicans of Haitian descent, long-term efforts to critique human rights conditions in the Dominican Republic gained traction. Yet with increased scrutiny, existing tensions between Dominican and Haitian diaspora groups increased.

Miriam Neptune discusses the experience of screening her award-winning documentary, Birthright Crisis, as both an organizing tool and a focal point for dialogue between two communities with diverging narratives. Neptune documented collaborations between Haitian Women for Haitian Refugees and the Movement of Haitian-Dominican Women from 2004 to 2010, and is currently a manager of instructional media services at Barnard College.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Lindsay Stuffle by sending email tolstuffle@barnard.edu or by calling 212-854-2037.

Click Here to Visit Website.

Conversation with Dr. James Mark: "From the Second to the Third World: Rethinking Eastern Europes Cold War"

12:00pm - 2:00pm

International Affairs Building, Room 1201

Please join us for a lunch conversation on relations between East Central Europe and the Developing World with Dr. James Mark, the University of Exeter-based leading expert on the subject.

James Mark is Professor of History at the University of Exeter in the UK. His book The Unfinished Revolution: Making Sense of the Communist Past in central-eastern Europe recent book, was chosen as one of the 'best books of 2011' by Foreign Affairs. Professor Mark is regularly featured in various media, including BBC. Recently, he co-authored Europe's 1968: Voices of Revolt.

The unique framework of the event facilitates open, informal and interactive discussions on interesting topics. It is sponsored by Columbia University Central and Eastern European Club, East Central European Center, and Harriman Institute.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Filip Tucek by sending email toft2439@columbia.edu or by calling 9294218583

The New Kings of Crude: China, Oil, and Civil War in Sudan and South Sudan

12:00pm - 1:30pm

International Affairs Building, Room 918

Lecture with Luke Patey, Senior Researcher, Danish Institute for International Studies. Sponsored by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Lauren Mack by sending email tolem2111@columbia.edu .

Click Here to Visit Website.

Venezuela: Petroleum, Economics, and Politics in the "Post-Chavez Era"

12:00pm - 2:00pm

International Affairs Building, Room 802

SPEAKERS: Thomas O'Donnell, PhD. Visiting Professor at the John F. Kennedy Institute at the Freie Universitat Berlin, is a Senior Editor for Oil & Gas for the Business Intelligence Journal Semana Group in Bogot. He was a US Fulbright Scholar and Visiting Professor at the Centro de Estudios de Desarrollo at the Central University of Venezuela (CENDES/UCV). Luiz Pinto, PhD. Visiting Scholar at the Institute of Latin American Studies at Columbia University. He holds a PhD in economics, and was Director of the Brazilian South American Federation of the Chambers of Commerce and Industry. He worked advising and coordinating several industrial and infrastructure projects in Venezuela.

Abstract: Few words within the South American political dictionary would be as related to each other as Venezuela and petroleum. Together, they have been at the forefront of some of the most dramatic events that have shaped the region in the last fifteen years - Constitutional re-designs, military coup d'tat, general and oil strikes, popular upheavals, massive social policies, nationalizations, expropriations and confiscations, and "revisionists" geopolitical projects. Indeed, petroleum is the single most important variable shaping Venezuelan politics and economics.

This talk convenes two experts for a discussion of the evolving scenario for petroleum policies in Venezuela. Issues that will be addressed include the future of PDVSA, the upcoming projects at the Orinoco Belt, the international relations of Venezuelan oil, and the relations between petroleum policies and economic imbalances.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Esteban Andrade by sending email toeaa2127@columbia.edu

Renewed Trouble in China's Peripheries: Xinjiang, Tibet, Hong Kong & Taiwan

5:00pm - 6:30pm

International Affairs Building, Room 918

Columbia Modern Tibetan Studies Program presents a discussion with Nicholas Bequelin, Visiting Scholar at the China Center, Yale Law School, and Senior China Researcher at Human Rights Watch. Moderated by Robert Barnett. Open to all.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Robbie Barnett by sending email to rjb58@columbia.edu

Can the Post-2015 Development Agenda and Sustainable Development Goals Help Spur Africa's Transformation?

6:00pm - 8:00pm

International Affairs Building, Room 1501

Program:

  • Welcome and introductions
  • Lecture by Dr. Ibrahim Assane Mayaki, Chief Executive Officer of the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD)
  • Commentary provided by Akbar Noman, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs, SIPA and Senior Fellow, Initiative for Policy Dialogue
  • Q & A
  • Closing remarks and reception

Speaker bio: Dr. Mayaki was professor of Public Administration and Management in Niger and Venezuela where he served during the periods 1978-1982 and 1985-1 987. He also worked for ten years in the mining sector in Niger. From the period 2000 to 2004, Dr Mayaki was Visiting Professor at the University of Parix XI where he taught international affairs and international organizations.

He also led researches at the Centre for Research on Europe and the Contemporary World in the same university. In January 1997, under the presidency of Ibrahim Bare Ma'inassara, Dr. Mayaki joined the cabinet as Minister in charge for African Integration and Cooperation, before holding the position of Foreign Minister.

He was appointed Prime Minister of the country in November 1997. He remained in charge until January 2000. As Prime Minister of Niger, Dr. Mayaki played a catalyst role in enhancing the social dialogue in the country. He initiated the creation of relevant technical committees in charge of the negotiations with social partners.

In 1998, Dr. Mayaki, with the collaboration of the International Confederation of Free Trade Union, organized a national forum on social dialogue, and lead necessary consultations and measures which resulted in the creation of the first 'National Commission for social dialogue' (Commission Nationale sur le Dialogue Social) in 2000. This commission was the first created in Africa.

In August 2000, he created the Public Policy Analysis Circle (Cercle d'analyse des pol itiques publiques), a think-tank focusing on health and education policy. In 2004, he became Executive Director of The Platform supporting rural development stakeholders in Western and Central Africa (The Rural Hub), located in Dakar in Senegal. Since 2009, Ibrahim Assane Mayaki, is the CEO of the New Partnership for Africa's Development.

This event is sponsored by the Economic and Political Development concentration, International Organization Specialization, the Institute of African Studies and SPAN.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Ilona Vinklerova by sending email toiv2105@columbia.edu or by calling 212-851-4105.

Register

The Future of Media through Japanese Popular Culture: Crowd-Sourcing, Exploitation, and the New Economies of Work

6:00pm - 7:30pm

403 Kent Hall

Japanese popular culture has developed through the close collaboration between official producers and amateur fan creators, in manga, anime, music, games, toys and more. Is this reliance on fan productivity, for example in crowd-sourcing music for Hatsune Miku videogames, a new form of labor exploitation? Or does this collaborative creativity offer new, and progressive, approaches to thinking about the economics of work in a digital age? This talk draws on findings from Condry's recent book "The Soul of Anime," based on fieldwork in Tokyo anime studios and fan conventions.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Yoshiko Niiya by sending email to donald-keene-center@columbia.edu or by calling 212-854-5036.

The More Languages, The More English: On the Language Constellation in the European Union

6:00pm - 7:30pm

The Heyman Center, 2nd floor Common Room

Speaker: Abram de Swaan, Emeritus University Professor of Social Science, University of Amsterdam

Abram de Swaan is Emeritus University Professor of Social Science (universiteitshoogleraar) at the University of Amsterdam, where he has been Professor of Sociology since 1973. He was Dean of the Amsterdam School of Social Science Research since its foundation in 1987 until 1997 and has been its chairman since. He has been an editor of the general cultural review, De Gids (est. 1837) from 1969 to 1991 and contributed to many cultural and professional periodicals. For many years he contributed a weekly column to the national daily NRC/Handelsblad.

Join Professor de Swaan and he talks about the language constellation of the European Union.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Samantha Amazan by sending email tosa3268@columbia.edu or by calling 44618.

Click Here to Visit Website.

Register

Only a God Can Save Us - A film about Martin Heidegger and Nazism

8:00pm - 10:30pm

Deutsches Haus

Seating on a first come first served basis for this event.

Heidegger is one of the most influential of all twentieth-century philosophers, yet he was also a strong supporter of National Socialism in Germany. Is there a connection between Heideggers philosophy and his Nazism or is the coincidence accidental? More generally, is there a connection between philosophical theory and political practice? Heidegger died in 1976 what should we think of his never recanting his support for the Nazi movement even after the end of World War II and the Holocaust? --Stephen Hicks

From the films website:

Only A God Can Save Us Length: 118 min. Shot in 16mm, mini DV Country of Origin: Germany Shot in: USA, Germany, France, Holland

Persons featured in film: Kardinal Karl Lehmann, Bishop of Mainz Alfred Denker, Heidegger Biographer Hugo Ott, Freiburg University Victor Farias, Free University of Berlin Tom Rockmore, Duquesne University, USA Richard Wolin, City University of New York, USA Ted Kisiel, Northern Illinois University, USA Rainer Marten, Freiburg University Emmanuel Faye, University of Paris Bernd Martin, Freiburg University Iain Thomson, University of New Mexico, USA Jrgen Paul, Dresden University Silke Seemann, Freiburg University Rangvi Wesendonk Axel Graf Douglas, Schloss Langenstein

For further information regarding this event, please contact Peggy Quisenberry by sending email topq2@columbia.edu or by calling 212-854-3202.

Click Here to Visit Website.

Friday, October 10, 2014

The Disciplines Series: The Idea of Development Development and Underdevelopment in Postwar Europe

9:00am - 6:00pm

The Heyman Center, Second Floor Common Room

The economic aftermath of World War II in Europe is normally studied through the lens of reconstruction. However, many contemporaries saw backwardness as the main social and economic issue in several European regions. For these scholars, practitioners and policy-makers, reconstructing those economies not only would not have solved their structural problems; it might have even exacerbated their chronic underdevelopment and increased the gap with the more advanced regions. The history of postwar Europe is thus also the story of the attempts to overcome the structural backwardness of depressed regions through a conscious development effort, designed to bring radical changes to their economic and social structure in the long run.

While the history of postwar development ideas and institutions is mostly told as an extra-European history, this workshop will study the European roots of postwar development policies, and how they influenced development policies in the rest of the world. Far from remaining confined within European borders, this experience was in fact considered by the international development community as an incubator of lessons and ideas to be applied in underdeveloped areas worldwide.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Nicholas Obourn by sending email toheymancenter@columbia.edu

The Economic Outlook for Asia

12:30pm - 2:00pm

Uris Hall, Room 330

The Economic Outlook for Asia

Presented by the Jerome A. Chazen Institute of International Business.

Friday, October 10th, 12:30 2:00 p.m.

A joint discussion featuring Shang-Jin Wei, Chief Economist, Asian Development Bank (ADB); N. T. Wang Professor of Chinese Business and Economy, Columbia University; Lawrence Lau, Ralph and Claire Landau Professor of Economics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong; Lulu Chow Wang Senior Visiting Scholar, Columbia University

Shang-Jin Wei, in his new post as Chief Economist of the ADB, will offer a first-hand summary of the banks annual Asian Development Outlook with a glimpse into the economic performance and forecast of the 45 economies that make up developing Asia both for this past year and the next 24 months. In addition,Lawrence Lau will focus on quantitative easing and its effects on exchange rates, interest rates, and stock prices in the individual economies of this region.

Columbia University, Morningside Campus, Uris Hall, Room 330

Registration is required. There is no cost for this event. Lunch will be provided.

For questions, please call (212) 854-4750 or email Chazen@columbia.edu

About the speakers

Shang-Jin Wei assumed his current position as Chief Economist of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) in June 2014. Prior to that, Dr. Wei has been Professor of Finance and Economics, N.T. Wang Chair in Chinese Business and Economy at Columbia University's Graduate School of Business since 2007. He is also Director for the National Bureau of Economic Research's Working Group on the Chinese Economy and a Research Fellow at the Center for Economic Policy Research (Europe). Before joining Columbia University, he had had the positions of Assistant Director, Chief of Trade and Investment Division, Chief of Mission to Myanmar (Burma) at the International Monetary Fund, the New Century Chair Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and Associate Professor at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. He has undertaken consulting work for both private companies such as PricewaterhouseCoopers and government organizations such as the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and the United Nations. Professor Wei has published extensively on topics on international finance, trade, and the Chinese economy in leading academic journals. His research has also been reported in Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, Economist, Business Week, Chicago Tribune, and other news media. Professor Wei received his MS in business administration (finance) and Ph.D. in economics from University of California, Berkeley.

Lawrence Lau received his B.S. degree (with Great Distinction) in Physics from Stanford University in 1964 and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Economics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1966 and 1969 respectively. He joined the faculty of the Department of Economics at Stanford University in 1966, becoming Professor of Economics in 1976 and the first Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in Economic Development at Stanford University in 1992. From 1992 to 1996, he served as a Co-Director of the Asia-Pacific Research Center at Stanford University, and from 1997 to 1999, as the Director of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. He became Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in Economic Development, Emeritus, upon his retirement from Stanford University in 2006. From 2004 to 2010, Professor Lau served as Vice-Chancellor (President) of The Chinese University of Hong Kong. From 2010-2014, he was appointed Chairman of CIC International (Hong Kong) Co., Limited and currently serves as Ralph and Claire Landau Professor of Economics at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Professor Lau specializes in economic development, economic growth, and the economies of East Asia, including that of China. In 1966, he developed the first econometric model of China. He has authored, co-authored, or edited six books and published more than 170 articles and notes in international professional journals.

For further information regarding this event, please contact Chazen Insitute by sending email tochazen@columbia.edu .

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Columbia Voting Week: Perspectives from Iraq - Building a Democracy in a Multicultural Society

5:00pm - 7:00pm

Lerner Hall, Cinema

In the wake of years of tumult, what are the challenges of building a working democracy in a multicultural society like Iraq? Is democracy even possible? And, if so, what does such a democracy look like in a modern Iraq? Join Dr. Barham Salih as we engage with these questions and more.

Moderator: SIPA Professor DiPali Mukhopadhyay

Speaker: Former Kurdish Iraqi Prime Minister, Barham Salih

Reception to follow.

To attend, please RSVP.

Co-Sponsors: SIPACPUStudent Engagement

For further information regarding this event, please contact Kevin Gully by sending email to kg2515@columbia.edu or by calling 212-851-0264.

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Register

This List is drawn from the Columbia University Events Calendar: http://www.columbia.edu/events/today.html

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