Search Results for "agricultural " : 14

by / on October 7, 2011 at 4:44 pm / in Most Recent Column, Opinion, World

Left High and Dry

by This past week, I attended the annual Nairobi International Trade Fair, which is sponsored by the Agricultural Society of Kenya. Similar to a 4-H County Fair in the United States, which features children’s activities alongside agricultural displays, the fair’s marketed purpose is to educate the public on programs, companies, and organizations that work with Kenya’s agricultural and environmental sectors. Despite these good intention…

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by / on March 4, 2011 at 3:07 am / in Africa, Asia, Issue, Main Menu, World

Bye Bye Beijing

…n between African and Chinese governments could bring systematic, coordinated dissemination of technological and agricultural knowledge that would help production sectors across African states. Particularly, Chinese agricultural practices, revealed through studies conducted by the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa, have the potential to revolutionize African smallholder farming by introducing superior plant breeding techniques, specified…

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by / on March 4, 2011 at 3:25 am / in Interview, Issue

A New Currency for Climate Change

by Bill McKibben, one of the most prominent environmental activists and journalists today, has been at the forefront of the climate change movement since its inception. He wrote the first book on climate change, The End of Nature, in 1989. In 2007, he founded 350.org, an international organization committed to reducing global CO2 atmospheric concentration levels to 350 parts per million—the level scientists agree is environmentally saf…

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by / on October 31, 2010 at 8:23 pm / in Asia, Cover Story, Issue, World

Environmental Migrants

by Endless crowds of the desperately poor have long been a common sight in the sweltering South Asian metropolis of Dhaka, Bangladesh. But the forces pushing migrants into the city are not what they once were. Today, the shantytowns of Dhaka overflow with rural farmers fleeing a countryside devastated alternating Biblical floods and fierce droughts. The city is seen by these desperate migrants as a gem of opportunity. They find instead…

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by / on December 2, 2007 at 4:44 am / in Content, Domestic, Environmental, Issue

The Corn Conundrum

by If you are what you eat, then America is corn. It’s in just about everything we eat: soda, ketchup, English muffins, breakfast cereal, cookies, crackers, ice cream, BBQ sauce… hell, even cough syrup. It feeds the cattle that go into your hamburger. And now it’s going into our gas tanks as ethanol. It’s one of the nation’s most subsidized agricultural products; subsidies to corn farmers totaled about $5 billion in 2006. Recent increa…

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by / on March 30, 2013 at 12:09 pm / in Briefings

Briefing: Global Energy Policy

by Despite the efforts of global institutions, energy policy in the developing world continues to be driven by geology, engineering, and economics, not climate change, But it must be recognized that the developing world comes in many shapes and sizes, and the world is in the midst of a carbon-based energy revolution.  Dramatically large carbon-based energy resources—oil and gas—have been discovered over the past decade or so around the…

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by / on January 6, 2014 at 4:23 pm / in Asia, Fall 2013, World

The Raucous Caucasus

by Deep within the mountainous South Caucasus, there is a regional powder keg. For the last 20 years, Armenia and Azerbaijan have been trapped in a struggle over the province of Nagorno-Karabakh (NK), an originally Azerbaijani-controlled, but ethnically Armenian region that, following the dissolution of the Soviet Union, declared independence. Sandwiched between oil pipelines and competing interests from Russia, Iran, Turkey, and the…

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by / on March 27, 2013 at 11:30 am / in Domestic, Opinion

The Great Green Wall of China

by “The Great Wall of China is the only man-made structure visible from space.” How many times have we heard this phrase – in class, in the media, and on visits to China? The idea was first proposed by William Stukeley, an 18th century antiquarian dubbed the founder of the field of modern archaeology, in 1754. By the end of the 19th century, it had become an established fact that the Wall could actually be seen from the moon. Sin…

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by / on March 26, 2014 at 10:38 pm / in Domestic, Environmental, Mounir Ennenbach, Web Columnists

From Sea to Shining…Puddle?

by   China, Indonesia, India—all developing countries. Like many industrial nations, they face numerous environmental challenges. Yet, while dangerous levels of smog in Beijing capture the headlines in the Western world, nine other Chinese cities experienced far more days of severe smog than the notoriously-polluted capital did. And the air quality isn’t the only problem: water contamination abounds in these developing count…

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by / on October 15, 2010 at 9:54 pm / in Interview

Robert Jervis Waxes Pessimistic on Afghanistan

by Deployed in an Afghan poppy field. Narayan: You put forth the idea of withdrawal without winning in Afghanistan. One of your biggest arguments was that Taliban resurgence does not necessarily entail al-Qaeda resurgence. … Can one not argue that we will be repeating the same mistake we made when we pulled out of Afghanistan in the 1990s? Jervis: I think this is perhaps the biggest question we are facing. That is, what will happen wh…

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