Search Results for "USSR" : 14

by / on August 11, 2012 at 4:41 pm / in Domestic, Opinion, World

Olympics Mean Nothing Politically Anymore

…even actively harm them. Both boycotts involved convoluted diplomatic maneuvering, and neither the U.S. nor the USSR acted alone: in 1980 America rallied Canada, Japan, China, and West Germany, all of which refused to send athletes to Moscow; in ’84 the USSR kept Bulgaria, Mongolia, Vietnam, and East Germany from participating in the games. And these are just recent cases; examples abound from all points in Olympic history and from countries aro…

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by / on February 22, 2014 at 6:59 pm / in Middle East, Web Columnists, World, Zubair Akram

Afghanistan’s Terrible Trajectory

by Karzai Much discussion has surrounded the (anticipated) full withdrawal of American troops  from Afghanistan by end of this year. As a staunch critic of the war’s operations and foreign policy objectives, I was beyond happy upon news of what would be the end of this long-fought conflict. Yet, despite my initial excitement, far-ranging issues—such as the still looming and persistent threat from Al-Qaeda, the Af-Pak debacle, and the…

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by / on April 23, 2012 at 6:56 pm / in Opinion, World

PRC’s Grip over China’s Wild West

by In the beginning of October 1949, the bloody Chinese Civil War was nearing its end, and Mao Zedong had proudly declared the foundation of the People’s Republic of China (PRC). With the Nationalists defeated, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) could now focus on its aims on fully reuniting the country and instituting socialism. The disastrous effects of the latter aim are well-known. However, the vagueness of this first notion – of fu…

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by / on April 1, 2012 at 4:30 pm / in Campus

Political Minutes: Post-Soviet Authoritarianism

by Thursday evening, Professor Mitchell Orenstein of Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies presented his paper, “Post-Soviet Authoritarianism: The Influence of Russia in Its Near Abroad” as the last lecture in an eighteen-month series by the Harriman Institute. The paper is co-authored by Professor David R. Cameron of Yale University. Professor Orenstein’s research ranges from international economic policy t…

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by / on June 27, 2012 at 5:32 pm / in Opinion, World

Things Go Better with Coke

by Photos of villagers in Myanmar from Wikimedia Commons A pretty accurate barometer for a country’s international standing is probably how many foreign brands it hosts. I’m not equating material benchmarks with progress, but most Fortune 500 companies will do business in even the most ramshackle and violent of countries. So, it is telling that North Korea (DPRK) and Myanmar belong to one of the world’s most exclusive clubs: Along wit…

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by / on April 20, 2013 at 1:22 pm / in Opinion, World

The Lady is Not For Turning

by WikiCommons Margaret Thatcher was a conviction politician, driven by ideas and grounded in her principles. Her unshakeable belief  in economic liberalism and political freedom spread across the world. She oversaw the fall of communism in the USSR while China, India and Latin America opened up their economies and freed up their markets, leading to an era of unprecedented prosperity. Her legacy at home though is quite mixed.   To som…

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by / on December 19, 2011 at 11:43 pm / in Arctic and Antarctic, Cover Story, Domestic, Environmental, National Security, World

Diplomacy on Ice

by Illustration by Kaela Chambers Antarctica is home to more than emperor penguins and a few dozen humans with science citizenship barricaded in small hermetic bases. It is also host to an estimated 200 billion barrels of hydrocarbons, alongside large quantities of gold, silver, uranium, and many other rare metals underneath a pristine ice cap still virgin of commercial exploitation. Securing a territory with such a rich underground,…

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by / on May 4, 2012 at 2:07 am / in Arctic and Antarctic, World

Dire Straits

by Illustrations by Amalia Rinehart Ever since Egypt’s great Pharaonic dynasties and through the successive apogees of Athens, Rome, and Istanbul, the Mediterranean Sea has been at the world’s political center, constantly in the grip of global powers. Thanks to its geographical position, the Mediterranean basin has played a critical role in commercial and cultural exchanges between mighty Asia, old Europe, and the great new world. How…

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by / on December 18, 2009 at 7:42 am / in Issue, Latin America, Main Menu, World

Friending Cuba

by “The time is ripe for change in Cuba.” Many have made this claim before, and many have been dead wrong. Indeed, the Cuban Castro regime, having survived to see ten U.S. presidents come and go, outlasted an embargo for over fifty years while maintaining its communist-authoritarian integrity. His rule has inspired, as of late, a spate of rather pessimistic literature. There is great doubt as to the ability of a democratic movement to…

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by / on March 1, 2005 at 10:05 am / in Middle East, World

Iran on the Brink

by Illustration by Mark Clements Iran wants nuclear weapons, and it is about to get them. If not seriously deterred, Iran will undoubtedly (really, this time) possess nukes within the next two to three years. It is universally regarded— even by the French—that Iran’s nuclear program is much more advanced than Iraq’s ever was, and, even though Iran is a signatory of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, leaders in Tehran refused to rat…

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