Search Results for "1983" : 13

by / on May 4, 2013 at 6:40 pm / in Blast from the Past, Cover Story, World

When the Sky Was Red

by Editor’s Note: This Saturday, March 1st, marks the 60th anniversary of Castle Bravo, the United States’ most powerful nuclear detonation to date. To better illuminate this oft-forgotten issue, we are republishing Narayan Subramanian’s piece from our Spring 2013 edition.   “The sky turned red and it rained for four days straight. If there was ever a time you thought the world was going to end, it was that day.” Thes…

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by / on February 28, 2014 at 4:40 pm / in Blast from the Past, Domestic, World

When the Sky was Red

by Editor’s Note: This Saturday, March 1st, marks the 60th anniversary of Castle Bravo, the United States’ most powerful nuclear detonation to date. To better illuminate this oft-forgotten issue, we are republishing Narayan Subramanian’s piece from our Spring 2013 edition.  “The sky turned red and it rained for four days straight. If there was ever a time you thought the world was going to end, it was that day.”   Th…

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by / on October 12, 2014 at 3:12 pm / in Campus, Events

Events 10/13 – 10/19

by Monday, October 13th Perspectives of Global Development 2014: Boosting Productivity to Meet the Middle Income Challenge 10:00am – 12:30pm International Affairs Building, Room 1501 Carl Dahlman is Head of the Thematic Division and Head of Global Development Research at the OECD’s Development Centre. Prior to joining the OECD in September 2013, he was an Associate Professor at Georgetown University’s School of Foreig…

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by / on November 11, 2014 at 8:25 pm / in Current Issue, Latin America, World

Gunning For Brazil

by I n March 2014, members of Brazil’s indigenous Guaraní tribe attempted to peacefully reclaim their ancestral homeland from a rural rancher. The move proved a temporary boon for the community: The landowner abdicated his property, and the Guaraní began to slowly rebuild their homes in the area, which had been taken over and cleared by ranchers in the 1970s. The next month, however, armed men with motorcycles and pistols brought a wav…

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by / on April 12, 2015 at 7:29 pm / in Campus, Events

Events 04/13-04/18

by Monday, Apr 13th The Columbia Academic Symposium in International Relations with Jamie Kirchick: A Critical Response Monday, April 13, 2015 – 10:30am  – 6 :00pm CIRCA Academics held the annual Columbia Academic Symposium in International Relations on the 11th of April this year, hosting accomplished journalist Jamie Kirchick, best known for breaking the story on Texas Senator Ron Paul’s homophobic and racist newsletters,…

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by / on May 8, 2015 at 8:36 pm / in Asia, Current Issue, World

Malaysian Malaise – Poor Prospects for Democracy in Anwar Ibrahim’s Legal Woes

by To be sure, the headline “Malaysian Court Upholds Opposition Leader’s Sodomy Conviction” is not necessarily shocking in its own right. This is, after all, the era in which political figures being caught up in purportedly lurid sex scandals is now almost cliché. But setting aside that opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim’s “crime” is an activity that many do freely around the world, the drama’s deeply troubling nature stems from the unple…

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by / on March 3, 2014 at 1:53 pm / in Events

*Updated* Exciting Events March 3rd-9th

by In order to facilitate active political participation and discussion here at Columbia, CPR is happy to provide a rundown of this week’s on-campus events. If we missed anything, please let us know by emailing Web Editor Stewart Shoemaker at sms2318@columbia.edu Tuesday, March 4th CPU Talks: Political Participation Time: 8:00-9:00pm Location: Hamilton 503 Students from three groups on campus will share their take on the given…

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by / on March 17, 2012 at 11:15 am / in Briefings, Education

Briefing: Education Reform

by The current state of the education reform movement has been referred to as the Civil Rights movement of our time. This description is certainly justified. In 1954, the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education declared the racial segregation of public schools unconstitutional, recognizing that every child in the United States has the right to quality public education, regardless of personal background. Newly integrated…

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by / on May 1, 2005 at 12:02 pm / in Congress, Cover Story, Domestic, Election, Media

Left Hanging

by Illustration by Aaron Rosenberg If a donkey brays in the woods, but nobody hears it, does it make a sound? Democrats must wonder. And what makes them all the more ignorant is that donkeys aren’t normally found in the woods. In the elections of 1954, the Democratic Party gained control of the House of Representatives and the Senate. It was not to lose control of either chamber until 1980, and, even then, it held onto the House, Sena…

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by / on October 28, 2011 at 3:25 pm / in Most Recent Column, Opinion, World

Rethinking the Past

by Here’s the thing about dictators: as sticky as they are when they’re in power, it’s even harder to deal with them once they’re gone. It’s an issue that is still being grappled with in Latin America. How do we create democratic institutions from scratch? How do we view the dictatorial era itself? Is political and economic stability worth a suspension of human rights? Perhaps one of the most difficult and pertinent questions for moder…

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