Search Results for "1983" : 10

by / on May 4, 2013 at 6:40 pm / in Blast from the Past, Cover Story, World

When the Sky Was Red

by Editor’s Note: This Saturday, March 1st, marks the 60th anniversary of Castle Bravo, the United States’ most powerful nuclear detonation to date. To better illuminate this oft-forgotten issue, we are republishing Narayan Subramanian’s piece from our Spring 2013 edition.   “The sky turned red and it rained for four days straight. If there was ever a time you thought the world was going to end, it was that day.” Thes…

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by / on February 28, 2014 at 4:40 pm / in Blast from the Past, Domestic, World

When the Sky was Red

by Editor’s Note: This Saturday, March 1st, marks the 60th anniversary of Castle Bravo, the United States’ most powerful nuclear detonation to date. To better illuminate this oft-forgotten issue, we are republishing Narayan Subramanian’s piece from our Spring 2013 edition.  “The sky turned red and it rained for four days straight. If there was ever a time you thought the world was going to end, it was that day.”   Th…

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by / on October 4, 2013 at 1:36 pm / in Asia, Kyle Dontoh, Opinion, Web Columnists, World, World

Great Barrier Grief

by For the past few years, Australia’s economy has largely avoided the downturn that other Western economies have experienced. Unemployment peaked at 5.7%, far below the US peak of 10.2% and less than half of the Eurozone peak of 12.1%. Between 2004 and 2009, the economy grew at an average rate of 5.3%– exceptionally strong growth for a developed economy. According to a 2011 Credit Suisse report, the Australians are the second we…

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by / on October 12, 2014 at 3:12 pm / in Campus, Events

Events 10/13 – 10/19

by Monday, October 13th Perspectives of Global Development 2014: Boosting Productivity to Meet the Middle Income Challenge 10:00am – 12:30pm International Affairs Building, Room 1501 Carl Dahlman is Head of the Thematic Division and Head of Global Development Research at the OECD’s Development Centre. Prior to joining the OECD in September 2013, he was an Associate Professor at Georgetown University’s School of Foreig…

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by / on March 17, 2012 at 11:15 am / in Briefings, Education

Briefing: Education Reform

by The current state of the education reform movement has been referred to as the Civil Rights movement of our time. This description is certainly justified. In 1954, the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education declared the racial segregation of public schools unconstitutional, recognizing that every child in the United States has the right to quality public education, regardless of personal background. Newly integrated…

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by / on March 3, 2014 at 1:53 pm / in Events

*Updated* Exciting Events March 3rd-9th

by In order to facilitate active political participation and discussion here at Columbia, CPR is happy to provide a rundown of this week’s on-campus events. If we missed anything, please let us know by emailing Web Editor Stewart Shoemaker at sms2318@columbia.edu Tuesday, March 4th CPU Talks: Political Participation Time: 8:00-9:00pm Location: Hamilton 503 Students from three groups on campus will share their take on the given…

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by / on December 19, 2011 at 11:37 pm / in Domestic, Interview, Media

American Politics Illuminated

by Illustration by Amalia Rinehart Ron Suskind, critically acclaimed author of narrative nonfiction, has been a leading voice in addressing and explaining critical issues impacting Americans on the national stage. A Pulitzer-Prize winner, Suskind was the senior national affairs writer for the Wall Street Journal from 1993 to 2000. Suskind’s past best-selling books include: A Hope in the Unseen, The Way of the World, The One Percent Do…

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by / on May 1, 2005 at 12:02 pm / in Congress, Cover Story, Domestic, Election, Media

Left Hanging

by Illustration by Aaron Rosenberg If a donkey brays in the woods, but nobody hears it, does it make a sound? Democrats must wonder. And what makes them all the more ignorant is that donkeys aren’t normally found in the woods. In the elections of 1954, the Democratic Party gained control of the House of Representatives and the Senate. It was not to lose control of either chamber until 1980, and, even then, it held onto the House, Sena…

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by / on October 28, 2011 at 3:25 pm / in Most Recent Column, Opinion, World

Rethinking the Past

by Here’s the thing about dictators: as sticky as they are when they’re in power, it’s even harder to deal with them once they’re gone. It’s an issue that is still being grappled with in Latin America. How do we create democratic institutions from scratch? How do we view the dictatorial era itself? Is political and economic stability worth a suspension of human rights? Perhaps one of the most difficult and pertinent questions for moder…

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by / on March 17, 2012 at 10:52 am / in Cover Story

Grooming the Globe

by Illustration by Daryl Seitchik One can hardly fail to notice the growing “cornflake-ification” of politics in the midst of the 2012 Republican primaries. Ideology has become irrelevant; the focus is now on personality. A candidate’s hairstyle counts as much as his views on immigration – or on, say, Libya. The voter is the consumer, the candidate the product. Behind this growing business lurk some of the most powerful men of the mod…

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